A Private Pond Water Element for Your Lawn

Most people think of the impressive masterpieces that grace the front of public buildings when they think of fountains. brk-303-1__85451.jpg However, they can really fit any decor, as they can be made in just about any shape, size, and design. A pond fountain can be a fantastic accessory to your own yard.

Owning one can benefit your home in two principal ways. To begin with, fountains add charm and help everyone unwind. The sound of the water flowing combined with the lovely appearance is perfect to finish off a tough day. A bit of style and charm will also be added to the area. What’s more, your lovely fountain will interest your guests and you will find your parties more enjoyable.

The other reason to add this type of water element is to keep the water in your pond heathier for your fish. Fish are a lot better off if their water is flowing around and getting oxygen, and a pond fountain will do both of those things. Your fish will enjoy longer, healthier lives because of the flow of the water and the elevated oxygen level. You will notice an improvement in your flowers as well.

The Purpose of Water Fountains in Japanese Gardens

A water element is an absolutely vital part of any Japanese garden. Since Japanese water fountains are seen as emblematic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned at the entrance of buildings or shrines. Since water is the most important element of any Japanese fountain, the design is usually simple.

Bamboo is a widely accepted material to use for spouts and therefore often incorporated into water fountains. The basin, which tends to be made of stones, receives the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout.

It must have a worn-down, weathered look as well. People want their fountain to appear as natural as possible, so they position plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. To the owner of the fountain, it obviously is more than just nice decor.

An alternative is to buy a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. After some years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss grows over the stone.

Anyone who has an extensive area to work with can, of course, out in a much larger water feature. Give some thought to adding a delightful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

There are alternative options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. Attractive rocks, sand, or gravel are good alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to symbolize the water. In addition, flat rocks can be laid out close enough together to give the illusion of a babbling brook.

Style Variations for Outdoor Water Features

When you want to chill out for a moment and get some fresh air, a garden is the perfect place. While there is a lot of work involved in getting a new one designed and made, it is worth the effort for anyone who will be using it. Both the “curb appeal” and the value of your property will be driven up when you set up an eye-catching garden. A water feature is not the only way to improve your landscape; consider adding trees and bushes, paving your driveway, or even putting in some eye-catching statues.

A significant improvement to your garden can be achieved by installing a water fountain. Where you once had a basic area, you will now have an outdoor wonderland. The trickling water of your fountain will not only give you a calming haven, it will also attract wild birds and other friendly local critters. The rest of the garden will immediately become just background to the beautiful new fountain.

Where did Large Garden Fountains Begin?

A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to supply drinkable water, as well as for decorative purposes.

Originally, fountains only served a functional purpose. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, via aqueducts or springs nearby. Until the late 19th, century most water fountains functioned using the force of gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a supply of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Artists thought of fountains as wonderful additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to provide clean water and celebrate the artist responsible for creating it. The main components used by the Romans to create their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly depicting animals or heroes. To replicate the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages introduced fountains to their designs. King Louis XIV of France wanted to illustrate his dominion over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. The Romans of the 17th and 18th centuries created baroque decorative fountains to exalt the Popes who commissioned them as well as to mark the spot where the restored Roman aqueducts entered the city.

Indoor plumbing became the key source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby restricting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. The introduction of special water effects and the recycling of water were two things made possible by replacing gravity with mechanical pumps.

Beautifying city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the uses of modern-day fountains.

Rome’s Ingenious Water Delivery Solutions

Rome’s first raised aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, inhabitants living at higher elevations had to rely on local creeks for their water. When aqueducts or springs weren’t available, people dwelling at raised elevations turned to water drawn from underground or rainwater, which was made possible by wells and cisterns. To supply water to Pincian Hill in the early sixteenth century, they implemented the emerging technique of redirecting the circulation from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. Pozzi, or manholes, were built at standard intervals along the aqueduct’s channel. The manholes made it less demanding to maintain the channel, but it was also possible to use buckets to pull water from the aqueduct, as we discovered with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he possessed the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. It seems that, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t sufficient to satisfy his needs. To give himself with a much more practical system to obtain water, he had one of the manholes exposed, providing him access to the aqueduct below his residence.


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