Vitalize Your Yard with the Use of Feng Shui

Experience the health benefits of feng shui by adding its design elements into your yard.

Size is not the most important consideration when incorporating feng shui design to your garden. If you have a lush, beautiful one, that is great, but even a small area works well with feng shui design.

Feng shui techniques are identical whether you are working in your garden or your residence. In order to learn the energy map, or bagua, of your garden, you will first want to understand your home’s bagua. a_268__43508.jpg

Before getting started, make sure you grasp the five elements of feng shui so that you can make the most of their energy.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is essential to incorporate it. A perfect addition to the northeast corner of your yard might be a serene Zen garden decorated with natural stone, as they represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Anyone thinking about adding a water element into their garden should place it in one of these feng shui areas: North (career & path in life), Southeast (money and abundance), or East (health & family).

The Pull of Multi-Tiered Water Elements

For many years now now, multi-tiered fountains have been prevalent, particularly in gardens. You can see many of these fountains in Italy, Spain, and other Southern European countries. Piazzas and building courtyards are very popular areas where you will see tiered fountains. Impressive carvings can be found on some of the most lavish tiered fountains, while others have much simpler designs.

People love to showcase them in areas having a more traditional look and feel. The fountain should seem as old as the rest of the space and blend in accordingly.

The Results of the Norman Invasion on Anglo Saxon Gardens

The introduction of the Normans in the second half of the 11th century irreparably altered The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. The Normans were better than the Anglo-Saxons at architecture and horticulture when they came into power. But nevertheless home life, household architecture, and decoration were out of the question until the Normans taken over the rest of the population. Because of this, castles were cruder buildings than monasteries: Monasteries were usually significant stone buildings set in the biggest and most fecund valleys, while castles were erected on windy crests where their citizens dedicated time and space to projects for offense and defense. The calm practice of gardening was unlikely in these dismal bastions. The best example of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture existent in modern times is Berkeley Castle. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time period. A monumental terrace serves as a hindrance to intruders who would try to mine the walls of the building. A scenic bowling green, enveloped in grass and surrounded by battlements clipped out of an ancient yew hedge, forms one of the terraces.

Set up Your Privatel Garden Water Element in Your Business

You can grow your business by putting in a garden fountain. A charming feature such as this will make customers feel welcome to your workplace. In contrast to the more familiar fountains found in people’s homes, garden fountains installed in corporate areas should create a lasting impression as well as provide a warm, welcoming ambiance.

It is vital to any company to get visitors and then also make a positive impression on them. Do not worry if you only have a small space, including a garden water fountain and some beautiful flowers will go a long way. Even larger, more alluring garden displays can be set up in corporate areas that have more open space available. That said, there are a lot that only have space for a small display with which to make an impressive and lasting statement.

The main idea here is that you need to bring in new customers and make a lasting impression. Your garden fountain will function much like a welcoming embrace to new clients thinking about working with your firm.

The Reason for Water Elements in Japanese Gardens

You will rarely see a Japanese garden that does not feature a water feature. Since Japanese water fountains are considered symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. It is unusual to see elaborately -designed Japanese fountains since the focus is supposed to be on the water itself.

Many people also opt for a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. Underneath the bamboo spout is generally a stone basin which receives the water as it flows down from the spout. It ought to have a worn-down, weathered appearance as well. It is vital that the overall look of the fountain goes with the natural setting, so people typically place plants, rocks, and flowers around it. Clearly, this fountain is something more than just a simple decoration.

For something a bit more unique, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then embellish it creatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. Over the years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

Bigger water features can be designed if there is enough open land.

Nice add-ons include a babbling stream or tiny pool with koi in it.

Japanese fountains, though, do not necessarily need to have water in them. It is okay to use representations of water in place of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. In addition, flat stones can be laid out close enough together to create the illusion of a babbling brook.


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