The Prevalence of Fountains in Japanese Landscapes

You will seldom see a Japanese garden that does not have a water feature. They tend to be placed right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are thought to be representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. 53245ms__31213.jpg Since water is the most important component of any Japanese fountain, the design is generally simple.

Many people also choose a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. The bamboo spout is positioned over the basin, typically made of natural rocks, and water trickles out. Even when new, it should be made to look as if it has been outside for a long time. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are commonly put in place around a fountain so that it seems more connected with nature. Needless to say, this fountain is something more than just a simple decoration.

An alternative is to get a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. In time, as moss progressively covers the rocks, it starts to look even more natural-looking.

More substantial water features can be designed if there is enough open land. Popular water feature additions are a koi pond or any sort of small pool, or even a meandering brook.

Water, though, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Lots of people prefer to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in actual water. In addition, flat rocks can be laid out close enough together to create the impression of a rippling brook.

Admire the Splendor of the Cascade Water Feature at Chatsworth Garden

The Cascade garden fountain creates a dazzling focal point to the gardens and is located at the back of Chatsworth House. Extending down the hillside for 200 yards towards the home is a series of twenty-four irregularly spread stone steps. Founded on a 17th century French design, the Cascade is also completely gravity fed. In 1696, this water fountain was built for the original Duke of Devonshire and has remained unchanged ever since that time. The Cascade House stands at the very top of the fountain where water flows downward. Decorated on the outside of the house with ocean creatures in bas-relief, the dwelling is a smaller building. Water pressure to the Cascade can be enhanced on special occasions, meaning the Cascade House becomes part of the Cascade display, as water spills through conduits on its roof and from the mouths of its carved ocean creatures, before continuing all the way down the Cascade. The sound of the water cascading fluctuates as it descends down the Cascades because of the minor variance in the size of each and every step thereby supplying a great and soothing accompaniment to a walking through the gardens. In 2004, Chatsworth's Cascade was named the best water fountain in England.

Classic Greece: The Origins of Outdoor Statue Design

Nearly all sculptors were paid by the temples to accentuate the elaborate pillars and archways with renderings of the gods right up until the stage came to a close and countless Greeks started to think of their religion as superstitious rather than sacred, when it became more common for sculptors to represent ordinary men and women as well. Portraiture, which would be accepted by the Romans upon their annexation of Greek society became conventional as well, and thriving family members would sometimes commission a rendering of their forebears to be added in enormous familial tombs. It is wrong to state that the arts had one function during the course of The Classical Greek period, a time of creative achievement during which the use of sculpture and alternative art forms evolved. Greek sculpture was actually a modern part of antiquity, whether the reason was faith based fervor or visual fulfillment, and its contemporary quality might be what endears it to us now.

Acqua Vergine: The Remedy to Rome's Water Troubles

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct built in Rome, started delivering the people living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had counted on natural springs up till then. During this time period, there were only two other techniques capable of delivering water to higher areas, subterranean wells and cisterns, which accumulated rainwater. Beginning in the sixteenth century, a unique method was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean segments to provide water to Pincian Hill. Through its initial building and construction, pozzi (or manholes) were placed at set intervals alongside the aqueduct’s channel. Even though they were originally designed to make it possible to service the aqueduct, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi started out using the manholes to gather water from the channel, commencing when he purchased the property in 1543. The cistern he had made to gather rainwater wasn’t adequate to meet his water needs. To provide himself with a much more effective means to obtain water, he had one of the manholes exposed, giving him access to the aqueduct below his property.

Fountain Builders Through History

Frequently working as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and discerning scholars, all in one, fountain designers were multi-talented people from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century. During the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci illustrated the creator as an innovative master, inventor and scientific virtuoso. The forces of nature inspired him to examine the properties and motion of water, and due to his fascination, he methodically captured his ideas in his now renowned notebooks. Transforming private villa settings into innovative water exhibits full with symbolic significance and natural beauty, early Italian water fountain designers paired imagination with hydraulic and gardening knowledge. The splendors in Tivoli were provided by the humanist Pirro Ligorio, who was renowned for his skill in archeology, engineering and garden design. Masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water attributes and water pranks for the various properties in the vicinity of Florence, some other water fountain creators were well versed in humanistic issues as well as classical scientific texts.


Rome, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, And Water Fountains
There are many famous Roman water fountains in its city center. Gian Lorenzo Bernini, one of the finest sculptors and artists of the 17th century planned, created and built nearly all of them. He was also a urban designer, in... read more
Impressive Water Displays Across the World
And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height. read more
How to Choose the Ideal Spot for Your Water Feature
Anywhere people come together to sit and take in the fresh air is perfect for another option, a garden sculpture style. read more
Spruce up Your Backyard with the Use of Feng Shui
Think about integrating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and... read more