Cultural Statuary in Old Greece

Although the majority of sculptors were remunerated by the temples to decorate the sophisticated columns and archways with renderings of the gods of old, as the period came to a close, it became more common for sculptors to portray ordinary people as well mainly because many of Greeks had started to think of their religion as superstitious rather than sacred. Portraiture, which would be recognized by the Romans upon their annexation of Greek society became conventional as well, and thriving families would often commission a portrait of their forebears to be added in immense familial tombs. The use of sculpture and other art forms differed over the many years of The Greek Classical period, a time of creative growth when the arts had more than one goal. r-103__06939.jpg Whether to gratify a visual desire or to commemorate the figures of religion, Greek sculpture was an imaginative method in the ancient world, which could be what draws our focus today.

Creators of the First Outside Garden Fountains

Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were multi-faceted people, Throughout the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci illustrated the creator as an imaginative master, inventor and scientific specialist. He methodically reported his examinations in his now much celebrated notebooks about his research into the forces of nature and the qualities and mobility of water. Early Italian water feature builders converted private villa configurations into amazing water exhibits full with symbolic meaning and natural beauty by combining imagination with hydraulic and horticultural experience. Known for his incredible skill in archeology, architecture and garden creations, Pirro Ligorio, the humanist, delivered the vision behind the magnificence in Tivoli. Masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water features and water pranks for the numerous mansions in the vicinity of Florence, other water feature creators were well versed in humanistic issues as well as ancient technical texts.

Contemporary Garden Decor: Outdoor Fountains and their Roots

The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complete your home.

Pure practicality was the original purpose of fountains. Water fountains were connected to a spring or aqueduct to supply potable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Until the late 19th, century most water fountains operated using the force of gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a source of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Artists thought of fountains as wonderful additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to supply clean water and celebrate the designer responsible for creating it. Roman fountains usually depicted images of animals or heroes made of metal or stone masks. Muslims and Moorish garden designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller models of the gardens of paradise. Fountains enjoyed a considerable role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exercise his power over nature. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to exalt their positions by adding decorative baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

The end of the 19th century saw the rise in usage of indoor plumbing to supply drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to purely decorative elements.

Gravity was replaced by mechanical pumps in order to permit fountains to bring in clean water and allow for beautiful water displays.

Modern fountains are used to adorn public spaces, honor individuals or events, and enhance recreational and entertainment events.

Water-raising System by Camillo Agrippa

The admiration Agrippa’s water-lifting creation earned from Andrea Bacci in 1588 was temporary. Only years afterward, in 1592, the early modern Roman waterway, the Acqua Felice, was linked to the Medici’s villa, perhaps making the unit outdated. The more plausible explanation is that the unit was abandoned once Franceso di Medici, Ferdinando’s siblingexpired in 1588, leading him to give up his rank as cardinal and go back to Florence where he accepted the throne as the Grand Duke of Tuscany. There might have been other significant water-related works in Renaissance gardens in the late sixteenth century, such as fountains that played tunes, water caprices (or giochi d’acqua) and also scenographic water exhibits, but none were powered by water which defied gravity.

Explore the World’s Tallest Water Features

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia has the highest continuously- running water fountain known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985). Reaching incredible heights above the Red Sea, this fountain propels water 260 meters (853 feet) in the sky.

Reaching water levels of 202 meters (663 feet), the World Cup Fountain in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), is recognized as the second highest worldwide.

Occupying third place is the Gateway Geyser (1995), located near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri. This fountain is considered the tallest in the United States with water reaching up to 192 meters (630 feet).

Next is the fountain found in Karachi, Pakistan (Port Fountain) which jets water up to 190 meters (620 feet) in height.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can attain up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are running, even though it normally only reaches up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain, opened to the public in 2009, is located next to the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. Once every 1/2 hour, this fountain begins dancing to pre-recorded musical themes while shooting water 73 meters (240 feet) high. It also has extreme shooters, rarely used, which go as high as 150 meters (490 feet).

Making it in the top 8 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra (1970) which measures 147 meters (482 feet).

Last of all is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet).


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